All Posts in Category: South Carolina

Diving Related Spinal-Cord Injuries

As the sun begins to beat heavily down during the summer, people start turning to the relief of cool swimming pools and refreshing lakes for recreation. During the summer months, carefree attitudes coupled with the increasing need to stay cool contribute to a major spike in diving-related SCIs. In a study highlighted by the NCBI, 88% of diving-related cervical spine injuries examined occurred in the summertime, and 97% were sustained by healthy young men (under the age of 27).

Cervical Spine Injuries

The cervical section of the spine is comprised of seven vertebrae that connect the base of the head to the trunk and shoulders… making the informal term for a cervical spine injury a “broken neck.” The results of these injuries can be devastating. Spinal cord damage can cause partial paralysis, complete paralysis, and death.

Diving Hazards

Shallow water: Water depth can be deceptive. Blindly diving into water that has not been previously examined can result in the diver striking the bottom head-first, causing great damage to the vertebrae. Above-ground, personal pools are notoriously shallow and known for causing many a diving accident.

Obstructions in lakes, rivers, and ponds: Natural bodies of water are rarely crystal clear, and are extremely susceptible to debris accumulation. Tree trunks, rocks, and man-made items such as tires are commonly found under the water, but seldom seen above it.

Natural landscape changes: While the ocean may seem like a wide, open opportunity for diving, the fact is that it can be just as hazardous as a murky pond. The ever-changing tide and forceful waves are capable of shifting the layout of ocean sands, causing sandbars to crop up where they previously weren’t. Diving head-first into solid sand can yield traumatic results similar to that of diving into solid concrete.

Staying Safe

Explore and examine: Never dive blindly into any body of water… be it pond, ocean, lake, or swimming pool. Hazards may be lurking beneath the surface, or the designated diving section might be smaller than you anticipated.

Avoid alcohol: Summer often brings with it carefree attitudes and rowdy get-togethers where alcohol is commonly involved. Diving hazards are to be taken seriously, and substances like alcohol often remove the ability to discern the difference between safety and recklessness.

Own responsibly: If you own a personal pool, you are responsible for the safety of the people using it. Ensure that depths are marked properly and that safety rules are clearly stated and posted.

Educate: Water-safety should be included in any child’s education, and diving is a topic that should not be neglected. Make it a point to teach children of possible diving hazards as well as the serious consequences of ignoring safety. Be repetitive and firm in your instruction.

Enjoy the Summer Responsibly

A commonality in diving-related injuries is that they are often suffered by young people who are otherwise strong and healthy. A vibrant future can be altered dramatically by one single dive. Equipping yourself with knowledge and awareness can ensure that you spend your summer enjoying yourself rather than spending it in recovery.

Sources:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2899837/

http://www.shepherd.org/resources/injuryprevention/diving

http://www.nature.com/sc/journal/v43/n2/full/3101695a.html

http://www.anationinmotion.org/ortho-pinion/think-twice-before-you-dive/

http://www.hughston.com/hha/a.cspine.htm

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The Best Way to Make Goals

We would be hard pressed to find one person who can honestly say that he or she has kept every New Year’s resolution they have made. That’s because resolutions tend to be broad, general wishes rather than planned, attainable targets. 

The month before the summer season is a great time to recommit to your resolutions and make them into thoughtfully planned goals. Preparing for your goals is the best way to equip yourself to achieve them. We’ve listed a few tips that will help your goals be more attainable and realistic. 

FOUR AREAS FOR GOAL SETTING

  • Nutrition. Many people use the turning of the New Year to try a new diet; however, most of these diets don’t make it past January. That’s because they are often based on gimmicks and promises of quick results. If you truly want to make lasting changes in your health levels, first speak with your doctor(s) about what is safe for your current health status. Then, look for a wellness program that emphasizes a well-balanced nutrition plan appropriate for you. Starting a food journal, or using a food logging app can help you stay on track. Summer is a great time to find fresh fruits and vegetables and learn creative ways to prepare them.
  • Fitness. After nutrition goals, the second most common goal for the New Year are fitness goals. In January, it’s easy to believe that you can dive into a high intensity workout time that requires a hefty time commitment. Although it’s good to challenge yourself, statistically you’re more likely to keep up with your commitment if you choose to set your goal as something that’s only a step above what you’re already doing. For example, if you don’t usually do any physical activity it may be realistic to make your goal to take a 15-minute walk every day instead of signing up for your local HIIT Training Class 5 times a week. As the weather is warming up, try something that you would enjoy outdoors.
  • Emotional. Most of us can make a point to try to be less stressed, however, without a plan this goal can actually make us more stressed. Whether you decide to start a journal or take up walking, make sure that the solution is something that can realistically fit into your schedule regardless of your season of life. Emotional goals can give you the opportunity to “bundle” your other goals. If cooking or walking serve as a tool for your relaxation, you’re not only fulfilling your emotional goals but also your fitness and nutrition goals. 

Your goals might not fall into any of the categories listed above, but that doesn’t mean that the same methods don’t apply. The strategy is the same for whatever goal you set – make a detailed plan with specific steps, set a realistic timeframe (for realistic goals), and stick to a deadline. And perhaps the most important of all is to get others involved. Have close friends, family, and or colleagues help keep you accountable. 

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